Cooking with Minnesota Mushrooms

This article is courtesy of our friend Jamie at So Happy You Liked It, a Minnesota Food Blog. Read the full post > 

Cooking with Mushrooms

Cooking with mushrooms is a healthy, economical, and delicious option if you’re wanting to eat vegetarian, vegan, or simply reduce your meat intake! This article includes some facts about mushrooms, different varieties that are on the market, and some scrumptious recipes for Mushroom “Crab” Cakes, Savory Crepes, and simple sautéed Lion’s Mane. 

Should this not be the vision and mission of the companies, businesses, and brands we get our food from? My friends at R+R Cultivation know a thing or two about delivering on their brand promise. They have a passion for offering gourmet and organically grown mushrooms in the Twin Cities market and beyond – driven by the desire to educate the community on where their food comes from. Eating local has officially taken on a new meaning in my book!

So let’s talk about mushrooms, you guys.

Where are my mushroom lovers at?! 

Undeniably, countless hands fly in the air.

What’s not to like? They’re an incredibly versatile ingredient that can be used in a myriad of ways. Some of which you may already be practicing in your own kitchen!

A few reasons why you should be adding mushrooms to your diet:

They’re healthy: 

  • One cup of sliced gourmet mushrooms has just 28 calories and less than 1 gram of fat, while delivering 2 grams of fiber and 3 grams of protein.
  • They’re packed with nutrients such as iron, niacin, vitamin D and are chalk full of antioxidants.
  • Mushrooms are the only sources of ergothioneine, which functions as an antioxidant and lowers systemic inflammation. Research published in the November 2010 issue of the “Journal of Medicinal Food” concluded that ergothioneine may prevent the buildup of plaque in the arteries that leads to cardiovascular disease.

They’re delicious:

  • Mushrooms are umami – one of the five basic tastes. They’re savory and take on a meaty flavor and texture when prepared accordingly.
  • There is a wide variety of textures and flavors, offering numerous ways to enjoy them.
  • They are a great meat substitute, often used in vegetarian and vegan dishes.

They’re easily accessible!

  • R&R Cultivation Mushrooms can be found at a number of Farmer’s Markets in the Twin Cities. Check out their website to see if your local market is on their list!
  • Local urban farmers provide a fresher product – they take far less time in transit in out cases, meaning less spoilage.
  • Mushroom offerings have vastly expanded in the past 5 years in the grocery industry, introducing new varietals and inspiration to the community.

So, have I convinced you to immediately seek out mushrooms on your next trip to the market?!

Good. I’m glad we cleared that up.

Different Types of Mushrooms

If you’re looking for new ways to enjoy these delicious fungi, you owe Nick and Lance at R&R Cultivation a visit. Their mushrooms are absolutely beautiful – YES, BEAUTIFUL! – and they offer a variety of different types:

Lion’s Mane: Once cooked, the fibers of this mushroom are very similar to the texture of meat, crab, or lobster. Lion’s Mane is delicious sliced in to steaks and grilled, torn in to bite sized pieces and sautéed in butter or olive oil, or substituted in dishes with meat.

Pink Oyster: Pink Oyster mushrooms taste like bacon or ham (YES I AM SERIOUS) and their flavor intensifies when cooked. The aroma is pungent, which is very characteristic of the oyster mushroom. The meat-like flavor makes Pink Oyster mushrooms a wonderful meat substitute in many dishes.

Oyster: Oyster mushrooms have a milder flavor and more tender consistency than Shiitake Mushrooms. They’re a great mushroom to throw in salads, sautée in a stir-fry, or stir in to soups.